Nakama London to sponsor London’s first Vue.js Meet-up

Nakama London is very pleased to announce that we’ll be sponsoring the very first London Vue.js meet-up.

Vue.js is a library for building interactive web interfaces, powerful enough to build full-scale applications. The framework is still fairly new but the uptake by the development community has been very strong, from those with intermediate JS knowledge through to full-time JavaScript developers.

With the popularity of the library predicted to grow even more in 2016, we’re expecting it to be a required skill by employers. The evening will (re)introduce the framework, and explore topic which will show you why it’s getting a lot of attention from the developers across the board.

Talks on the night include:

Building a UI style guide with Vue.js components

– By Jack Barham @jackbarham. Product designer and developer.

Vue.js, Vuex and Redux-like State Management

– By James Browne @onejamesbrowne. Full-stack engineer.

There are limited numbers for the event and registration opens today via the meet-up link.

The event will be held at The Nakama London offices, Thursday the 3rd of March, 2016.

Nakama London Tech team are really excited about the future of Vue.js and will be actively seeking out opportunities within the market, meanwhile if you’re a looking for a contract or perm role across the following skillsets speak to David Riley at Nakama London or email: driley@nakamalondon.com.

  • ReactJS
  • AngularJS
  • BackboneJS
  • Ember
  • JQuery
  • Underscore
  • JS

Screen Shot 2016-01-28 at 12.29.11

Nakama News – Our Group CEO speaks to Shortlist

Nakama Group plc CEO, Rob Sheffield speaks to recruitment publication Shortlist on the HR challenges of growing a business.

Read the full article here:

Short list:

Top recruitment executives share their hindsight regrets

Flight mode: Simple steps to disconnecting

TooManyNotifications

 

 

 

 

 

We are in the age of the notification. That silent but deadly little red icon that makes you aware that someone in your personal or work life has reached out to you and of course, you must immediately respond or risk harming your relationship, or appearing like your sense of urgency is lacking, or fear you might leave that person feeling like you just don’t give a damn. This thought process could be hugely damaging to not only your own mental well-being; but also that of other people in your life.

The Internet of Things has led to our lives being pulled at from every angle, at all hours of the day. Phone, iPad, Laptop – I am always online. I wake up, check my work emails, check Facebook, check Instagram, check Snapchat, check Whatsapp check my gmail. This ritual is then repeated throughout the day and generally again before I go to sleep at night. Often I end up feeling like I don’t know where to start when it comes to replying and leads to feeling a sense of exhaustion towards people in my life who are important. It isn’t their fault – it’s technology.

Why haven’t they replied to me? How could they have forgotten – they would have seen my email! How many times a week does that thought go through your head? If I replied to every single digital/social notification I’d never make it to work or actually have a real conversation with anyone, and this feeling; I am sure is reciprocated.

My solution was empathy and ironically – communication. Learning to switch-off respecting when others want to do the same. This isn’t about not answering that work email, or being lazy, or cutting people out – communication is what develops relationships, ensures people don’t feel neglected and keeps the everyday elements of our jobs and lives ticking along.

This is about communicating your right not to communicate. Unfortunately, going stone cold silent at work isn’t an option. But there are a few simple solutions to maintain a little more balance in your life and subsequently eliminating what I call ‘communication distress’ outside of hours:

  1. Let your nearest and dearest know you are going off the grid so they don’t think you’ve been kidnapped or arrested.
  2. Prioritise – Will that person really mind if I don’t get back to them straight away and does it need a response right now? Leave a time in your day where you get back/respond where necessary.
  3. Notification centre – that’s right you can turn those little silent alarms off! Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Whatsapp – determine when you want to check them by turning off notifications – feel the immediate sense of relief.
  4. Detox days: once a week decide to have a day (more practically done on the weekend) where you don’t connect digitally.
  5. I’ve even taken to banning my phone when I’m in the kitchen – create spaces in your home where it is a “phone free zone”.
  6. Building solid relationships won’t come down to double-tapping an Instagram post (while it’s nice to share the love) – ensure you are still maintaining real human interaction. Have a coffee for an hour, go browse a gallery or grab a juice with your friends.
  7. For god’s sake turn your phone on flight mode! That’s right switch your phone on flight mode a few hours before bed and until you get to work (if possible).

 

There are initiatives and resources where you can find out more about “switching off”. Be Kovert is a great site dedicated to streamlining your digital touch points and being mindful with your approach to technology. Another one of my favourite sites is Mindful who’ve also shared a brilliant article with simple tips on taking control of your tech habits.

Organisations are even starting to recognise the effect of technology is having on their employees mental well-being; Volkswagon have implemented “digital dams” to stop employees checking emails after-hours and the country (yes country) of France even brought in a labour agreement where employees are allowed to switch-off after hours.

We want to know how you’ve taken to switching off after work? Share your tips with us in the comments or Tweet us @NakamaGlobal 

Courtney Walker – Marketing at Nakama London

Why Management Doesn’t Get Millennials

millennials

So here we are, Generation Z ‘mobile only enabled’, Millennials, Gen Y, Generation Slashie and the Yuccie all co-existing. In a period where consumers are more confused than ever (see PepsiCo CEO: We’ve never seen consumers so confused) you can’t help but feel sorry for the manager of the truly diverse work force. At a time when the global workforce and economies face two key issues – a labor shortage and an ageing population – the contingent workforce is set to be over 50% contract globally by 2020.

Your average worker in the next decade could have over 7 jobs. It’s an increasingly common view and one held by Anton Andrews, Director of Microsoft’s Envisaging Lab, that the jobs of the future will involve a series of interactions over an increasingly short space of time. To put it more succinctly, it’s not just the workforce and consumers that are struggling, it’s the management teams and leaders of today and tomorrow.

The workforce around the globe has found it increasingly difficult to balance the demands of work and life. Many of us are working longer hours than ever before, delaying starting families or struggling to understand how their children are going to cope financially. Herein lies one of the key issues; the multi generational workforce is now so fragmented and different that management are faced with the task of engaging a workforce with multiple priorities. This raises the question, ‘does a company vision and culture suit all, or does today’s workforce require multiple visions and sub cultures to function?’ …A question for another time.

Back to the initial idea, the millennial workforce has been more affected than perhaps the newer generations entering the labour market specifically by the economy; workers in companies that shed employees are still doing the work of multiple people. Salaries have not increased in line with costs of living. This is certainly a contributing factor, however an important point to make is that most bosses just don’t get Millennials.

Research suggests that over 80% of Millennials are engaged in a dual income situation, with both individuals working full time. With Generation X, this figure drops to 70% and out of the generation of baby boomers born just after WWII, who incidentally occupy over 60% of top management jobs, only 45% have a full time working partner. More typically, this partner will work part time and will be responsible for taking care of home life duties. This leads to what Karyn Twaronite, EY global-diversity and inclusiveness officer, sees as an empathy gap in the workplace. Her view is one that I agree with: “when there’s frustration about work-life balance in the workplace, and you think your boss doesn’t get it, that very likely could be true.’

One of the key shifts in the workplace moving forward will be around real time communication and real time tools; responsive networks creating dynamic participation. In short technology, in the eyes of a modern workforce, frees them up to work from anywhere. The traditional management, who are more accustomed to work cultures with more face time, may start to see only empty cubicles. Crazily enough, at a recent Microsoft talk the audience of leaders were informed that 60% of desks in any organisation are empty at any moment!

The modern workforce are more about social, physical face to face moments, with 96% of people wanting a community and co-working human relationships, as a community increases productivity by 20%. For companies that are desperate to hire workers, specifically Millennials, the group that is apparently the one companies are desperate to attract and retain, is the most dissatisfied.

There have been multiple surveys from the likes of EY and BCG that show what Millennials most want is flexibility in where, when and how they work. Most would take a pay cut, turn down a promotion or be willing to move to manage work-life demands better. Only in Australia does the pay issue buck the trend. As a result, a key reason for moving in Australia is increased pay in line with work life balance.

Old school management styles have led to the millennial workforce feeling that having a flexible schedule leads to negative consequences. A lack of flexibility has been regularly cited as one of the top reasons in this generation for workers to quit their jobs.

Working in recruitment in a variety of different geographical areas, one of the key requirements from the millennial workforce we see focuses around work-life balance. This was increasingly uncommon in Asia until 18 months ago. The mindset of management needs to change from seeing flexibility as making an exception to the norm. The reality is that a large proportion of management are still managing the way they have been for over a decade, and a large proportion of companies and management teams have been slow to realise that the Millenials are feeling burned out; they seek a balance that a large proportion of the newer generational workforces demand.

Today’s management teams need to navigate a tricky environment, however they also need to realise that the workforce of the future and the work of the future will be technology based, require trust, empathy, collaboration and flexibility, and that if they want to hire and retain a millennial workforce the focus is on flexibility, health and relationships in equal measure.


Rob Sheffield is Nakama’s APAC CEO and is based in Sydney.

Meet Shuddha, our new Social Media Consultant in Hong Kong

Shuddha

Name/Title: Shuddha Dutta, Consultant

Sector you recruit for: Social Media and Content

What are you known for professionally?  I’m known to be very organised and I don’t really get stressed easily. I can remain absolutely calm under stressful situations, which I think is a valuable quality!

Where can we find you when you’re not working? I love the outdoors and I also enjoy photography. So when I’m not at work, I’m on a beach or hiking, as long as it looks nice and I can take pictures, that’s where you will find me.

Any secret/special talents? It’s not a secret, but I cook fairly well, especially Indian dishes such as biryani! I also love taking photographs, at the risk of sounding immodest, I take pretty good pictures!

What is your social media channel of choice? Instagram due to my photography hobby! I love taking and also looking at other photos.

What’s been your favourite thing about working at Nakama so far? People are friendly and helpful and I’ve really enjoyed that. They’ve made it really easy to settle in for me.

What’s the coolest thing you’ve done in HK? I just saw the last races of the season, which was a cool experience for me!

What do you love about working in recruitment? The opportunity to meet a lot of people from different backgrounds – culturally and professionally.


Shuddha is based in our NAKAMA Hong Kong office and can be reached on m: +852 94053120 or sdutta@nakamahongkong.com.

AdTech Singapore 2015

AdTech Singapore in my humble opinion is an absolute success story. The learnings I have taken away and the new friends I have made is enough to keep me happy for the next 6 months.

By means of my self-declared awesome eye-balling abilities, the event hosted a good 600++ delegates, many of whom flew in from all over the world. If there is any other event that can perform half as well as ATS and put all the major players across the industry in one room fuelled with engaging content, please let me know!

It is great to see Corporates taking the initiative to part take in discussions around programmatic, and exhibit a willingness to embrace change. I particularly liked the discussion around how clients could work at bringing/building an AdTech stack in-house. This is something that everyone should be clear about here. Clients are getting curious and investing in self-education. Hence, transparency does go a long way.

Overall, programmatic is the talk of the event. However, the subject of data took a deeper dive to show just how much importance it carries along with automation.

I don’t know if you’ve noticed. But the fact that AdTech has built a name for itself in the marketing ecosystem within a span of just 3 years (in Asia), I see a phenomenon of serious tunnel vision.

Technology seems to have taken over human touch. It has become so linear that binary and logic now seem to be the fundamentals of marketing.

I’ve always thought that AdTech is a subset of marketing, and eventually the collision between AdTech and Martech would take place. Great! More acronyms. How exciting! We haven’t heard much about the big boys like Oracle, IBM, Adobe. Guess what? We should start seeing a shift soon.

I’m glad this was discussed during ATS, as it makes total sense that silo players forge partnerships and make this eco-system a case of value giving, than monopoly.

After some intense jam packed content during ATS, I’ve finally been able to align my fragmented thoughts and put them in point form below.

Trends which May, Can or are Already happening 2015 – 2016

1) Lopsided effect (Demand vs Supply)

– New technology requires sales adoption. We have seen an influx of countless DSPs entering the market in hopes to grab a share of the pie. Internally, this means beefing up sales team, deploying them to approach ATDs and Direct Clients. Education of programmatic was rampant late 2014 – present. Traction across buy side gains momentum, but soon the realisation that the lack of supply could be a teething issue.

– This applies to organisations with fresh injection of funds that are looking to scale quick. Aggressive hiring of sales people, lack of vision that operations play an important role as well. 10 sales person to 1 campaign manager. Good luck.

2) Being Publisher centric 

– AdTech companies will evolve. DSP will not remain a DSP. Whichever way they wish to evolve, I’m seeing a shift in awareness for such platforms to get closer to the publishers. Self-serve platforms are already out there for Publishers.

3) Direct Deals

– Publishers and Brands are getting more educated and are investigating opportunities in PMP or Programmatic Direct. This pendulum effect where knowledge and activity shifts from agencies to in-house may happen very quickly.

4) Merger and Acquisitions

– We just got started. The $4.4billion deal between Verizon and AOL will trigger more to follow suit. Telecommunication companies are keeping their eyes wide open. There are already talks about AOL looking to acquire Millennial Media. Well, let’s see.

5) Branding could use Programmatic

– Programmatic is not all performance. For example, Cannes recently reported that Heineken is looking to use data to better understand its customers. Given that their business uses a three-tier system (Heineken sells to wholesalers, that sells to retailers and finally consumers), they aren’t exactly strong owners of first party data.

– However, working with data providers and AdTech vendors, they could essentially leverage on these data to better understand customers’ buying behaviour. Putting all these information together, generating a compelling creative and branding campaign could influence how well their brand awareness campaigns perform.

6) MarTech will emerge strong

– A one stop shop will present itself. A fully automated platform such as Adobe, Oracle, Marketo will continue to demonstrate capabilities in their technology, inching closer to clients.

As stated by Scott Brinker, president and CTO of ion interactive in his article on marketingland.com, the number of MarTech companies doubled to 2,000 in year 2015, from 947 in year 2014.

MarTech may form to be the foundation as a platform and allow AdTech players to integrate. With data being the core of it all, this brings us back to my first article about creating an Omni-Channel approach.

I don’t know about you, but i am still sticking to my earlier thoughts. Omni-channel. The market at present is going through a self-exploration stage. Eventually, data, programmatic, creative, out-of-home, tv, radio and every other channel we can think of will come together as one.

Seamlessly, creating great campaigns, paving the way for a better marketing ecosystem.

Signing off,

Alvin

“Change is the only constant”


Alvin Lim is our Nakama Singapore Digital Media Consultant who specializes in talent management within the Programmatic Media and Performance Marketing space. 

He represents the major DSPs, SSPs, Trading Desk, Social Media Tech platforms and many other brands in the Advertising Technology space in hiring top tier talents in Singapore and across Asia. Alvin can be reached on +65 94501337 or alim@nakamasingapore.com.

Creating a high performance culture.

At the recent Vivid talks in Sydney I had the privilege of listening to a variety of industry experts talk about a range of topics, from the multi generation work forces that employers are now dealing with to leadership, C21 talent and culture. Speakers ranged from the engaging Dr Fiona Kerr, Paul D’Arcy and Rahaf Hafoish, to name a few. The emphasis on most talks that day was around leadership, change and culture going hand in hand.

This struck a huge cord with me especially, based on what we are doing at Nakama and being able to observe many of the organisations we work with. For our clients and for us, finding good talent is key and the word culture gets used a great deal. What makes a great culture? How do some organisations quickly align with a common set of practices while others don’t? Being a multi geographical organisation, how do we continue to coordinate and integrate efforts globally? We are well on the way to setting clear values, expectations and processes, but how does any organisation prevent them from falling behind, or in some cases, operating behind the curve every step of the way.

Leadership within an organisation is the driver for culture. What interests me is how and why some organisations and leaders are able to achieve significant and lasting performance that catapults them ahead of the competition (or falls flat). What is the criteria for success vs. failure?

One of our training partners has continued to do great work with us on what defines our Nakama culture. Most of you will remember the breakout session, looking at how we define culture as “the way things get done around here.” This drives behaviour and ultimately performance. If a business, no matter how large or small, is able to define and set very clear and aligned values and processes, it has been proven that it will consistently outperform those that cannot. That does not mean that we should not look to evolve. One of the take home points for any leadership group is that you need to understand what you need to do to stay relevant – when to pivot according to the environment you operate in.

So what does a business and leadership team in today’s environment need to deliver high performance? There are numerous opinions on this. The 4 that resonate the most with me are:

  1. We must understand that we don’t work the way we used to and that we need to lead and manage differently. The workplace is changing and that includes traditional business models. We are now in a commercial environment where adoptive leadership is increasingly important. Agile workplaces are quicker to grasp this than traditional business models.
  1. Businesses and leaders within must have the ability to identify and to let go of the existing behaviours and practices that are no longer contributing to success. Getting people to acknowledge and understand that certain ways of doing things are no longer effective and actually getting them to change is a challenge all businesses face. Businesses that get this right take the time to change behaviours that are no longer supporting the desired goals. A common failure is that management dictate change and this in nearly all cases leads to failure. It is a big deal for people to be comfortable with giving up the way they’ve always done things. Some take it as what they’ve been doing all along was wrong.  Fear is a huge factor: “I might not be able to succeed if asked to do things differently!” Most importantly, leaders need to be role models for the behaviour and expectations, as if they don’t, then nothing will change.
  1. The ability to include all relevant stakeholders in the conversation is key. You cannot build a culture that is not centred on a collective concept. Leadership within an organisation has a huge responsibility for developing and demonstrating the culture, however it is not all down to them. Stakeholder input is key and if you have an environment that develops trusting relationships then you have a much stronger chance of the collective contributing to, and creating, the culture.
  1. Last but not least, everyone needs to be able to take a long hard look in the mirror. We operate in a world where we are constantly bombarded with information and the speed of business and change is moving faster than ever before. If you cannot take stock, pause for a moment to think and answer the simple or difficult questions, then you run the risk of continuing to do things exactly the way you always have. The challenges that businesses face now have changed and evolved over time, just as the culture of an organisation needs to. If you are able to pause then you are going to be far better positioned as an individual or organisation to identify the need to change or not, in order to keep pace with the market and drive results.

Leadership within organisations needs to navigate and change or overcome deeply rooted assumptions and behaviours within the environment that are preventing success. This can only happen if you are willing to take a long hard look in the mirror, ask the difficult questions and dig deep into what needs to change. That is the only way you can encourage people to let go of the traditional behaviours that, in many cases, no longer serve the purpose and goals of the organisation.


Rob Sheffield is Nakama’s APAC CEO and is based in Sydney.