Meet Sarah – Consultant for Technology at Nakama Sydney

Sarah Clayton Sydney

Name: 

Sarah Clayton

Title: Consultant – Technology

Which Nakama Global office do you work within? Sydney

What sector do you specialise in? Technology covering Contract and Freelance

What are you known for professionally? Being honest with how I work, I’m always upfront and approachable to clients and candidates.

What do you love about recruitment? The fast pace of a contract desk, the downs and then the ups! When something pulls through, when you thought it wasn’t going to, creates a real buzz.

What intrigues you most about your sector? At the moment EVERYTHING! I’m amazed by all the things the candidates are showing me in interviews, cool apps and games they have developed!

What’s the next big development in your sector? IoT –  We’re seeing a lot more roles in developing apps which are focused on Technologies that speak to each other – essentially giving users the ability to control their homes from their mobile.

What’s the coolest thing you’ve done while being in your city? Jet boating around the harbour on my first day in Sydney!

What would be impossible for you to give up? Chocolate! (of course!)

What is your social media channel of choice? Facebook

Any hidden talents/hobbies you want to let us know about? I did an art degree back in the UK and still like to have a dabble now!

If you’d like to speak to Sarah at Nakama Sydney about a role in Technology or you have a vacancy and looking for specialist talent  – get in touch by emailing sclayton@nakamasydney.com

If you’d like to know more about digital recruitment specialists Nakama Global visit www.nakamaglobal.com 

Our Sydney team is growing: Meet Dan – Consultant for Social Media & Digital Client Services

DanFitzp_NewStarter2

What were you doing before joining Nakama in Sydney? 

I spent five years in end-to-end retail recruitment. Previous to that I was in the hospitality industry for 12 years!

Why did you choose to move to Sydney?

I chose Sydney because I wanted a lifestyle change. The people are really friendly, there’s so much to do and I get to live by the beach with year round great weather. What else do you need in life?

What’s the coolest thing you’ve done since being in Australia?

I dived the Great Barrier Reef and climbed the Harbour Bridge, two things I’ve wanted to do for a really long time. I’m a bit of an adrenaline junkie, so I really want to go bungie jump and maybe even a parachute jump might be on the cards sometime soon!  Also you can’t come to Australia and not try surfing. I’ve also bumped into many kangaroos, which never gets old but still yet to catch a Koala.

What was the hardest part about leaving England? 

Leaving my friends and family behind was pretty hard but I think leaving Casper my Labrador was probably the hardest thing I have ever had to do. Oh and the cat but I don’t think she really misses me all that much.

Why did you decide to enter Recruitment & what do you love about it now? 

It was a complete accident a Resourcer job I took turned into a career in Recruitment.  Once I started Recruitment I loved meeting so many new people every day. Plus you’re always learning regardless of how long you’ve been recruiting and generally every day is different.

What are you known for professionally? 

The person who is really loud & keeps people entertained in the office. Aside from this I like to keep candidates on side and have their best interests at the forefront. I had a great desk in retail and it was always nice to have a lot of them come back to see me or recommend me to others.

What are you doing when you’re not working? 

I’m usually out socialising, at the gym or at the beach seeing as it is at the end of my road. I love my films as well and although the music scene in Sydney is not as good as the UK theres nothing better than live music. 

What would be impossible for you to give up? 

My friends!! What else do you have if you don’t have friends?? Besides them ice cream is probably a very close second.

If you’d like to speak with Dan about a role in Social Media or Digital Client services – email: dfitzpatrick@nakamasydney.com

Nakama Afterhours: Natasha Eyles – Business Support at Nakama London

Get to know what the team at Nakama Global do after 5pm!

Name: Natasha Eyles

Day Job: Business support at Nakama London

What do you get up to afterhours?

After hours I like to dabble in all sorts of new things! My persuits include archery, power-hooping and acting. I’m sure there will be more to add to the list soon (I can also be found at Stickman Cartel gigs after hours and now consider myself a full blown groupie – “Wooh Greg!!”)

How long have you been doing film/theatre – what was your first role?

I have been doing the odd bit of acting for just over a year now. My first short film was a little murder mystery called ‘The strange case of the theatre murder’ – being a huge fan of ‘Murder, She Wrote’ I was thrilled to be cast as Rosie in his little piece.

What got you into doing film and theatre? 

Sitting at home one cold December, bored and browsing the Internet I came across a website called City Academy. They do all manner of classes from script writing, dancing, singing lessons, burlesque and acting. So, I put myself out of my comfort zone and clicked on the 6-week acting course that was to be held every Saturday at the Saddlers Wells theatre in North London!

What productions have you appeared in? 

So far I have been in two short films with the Reading Film and Video Club (all amateurs). The first one as mentioned earlier and the second film is called ‘The 12.15 to nowhere’ (in production).

How do you get over the stage fright?

While doing my acting lessons we had to act out a couple of scenes, one of which meant I had to stand-up on my own, in front of the rest of the group and recite the lines I had to learn and it took me completely out of my comfort zone. To say I was nervous is the biggest understatement of 2015! But I did it! I had sweaty palms, a dry mouth And a heart rate equal to that of an Olympic 100m sprinter! It made me realise that theatre is not for me and I’m better suited to TV/Film.

Where can we see your films? 

Here is the link for my first film, all done as a hobby and we have a laugh so don’t expect a performance worthy of an Oscar https://youtu.be/zXOPWHs9Gz4

Are you working on anything at the moment?

I’m not currently working on anything at the moment, but I know there will be another phone call when they have a script ready for action! Who knows…one day an Oscar may well be sitting on my sideboard (if not I’m sure you can buy one on eBay).

Nakama London is Growing! Meet Eimear – Resourcer – Technology

Eimear Walsh

Name: Eimear Walsh

Title: Resourcer – Technology 

Sector you recruit for: Technology

What are you known for professionally? Coming from a Speech and Language Therapy background, I’m known for my strong communication skills!

Why did you want to pursue a career in recruiting for the Technology sector? I’ve always had a keen interest in Tech and also in people. As such recruitment with in the Tech sector is a ideal marriage of these two interests.

What intrigues you about the world of Digital/Techology? Everything!! I’ve always had a keen interest in the area but now that I’m becoming more immersed and I’m learning more, my intrigue has been heightened to new levels.

What’s the coolest thing you’ve done while being in London? My sister managed to wangle some VIP tickets for the Alexander McQueen exhibition in the V&A which was pretty amazing! 

What would be impossible for you to give up? Coffee…. I’ve tried and failed! 

What is your social media channel of choice? Instagram

Any hidden talents you want to let us know about?  I’ve been know to pick up a guitar and attempt some bad covers… But what I lack in talent, I make up for in enthusiasm.

What now for China?

china

China has experienced unprecedented growth over the past decade and during its long and colourful history there has rarely been a problem the Chinese government could not fix. However, as stock markets in the US, Europe and Asia tumble after lacklustre Chinese data, many are now going from asking the question around a Chinese slowdown to considering what that impact might be on the global economy.

China’s manufacturing sector has shrunk at its fastest pace since 2009 over the space of four weeks. Many believe this is another example of the malaise that has stunted growth in Asia and fuelled Latin American growth. US stock markets saw sell offs as trading opened. The Russell 2000 index (an index of smaller US groups) slid into what is termed a technical correction and the S&P had its worst week since 2011. The FTSE 100 fell 2.6% and the benchmark dropped 5.5% over a week, which was its worst performance all year. It didn’t stop there, with equities in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Indonesia entering bear market territory and US oil plunging below $40 a barrel. This is the first time this has happened since the financial crisis.

All of this came after the closely watched independent survey (caixin-markit China manufacturing purchasing managers index) dropped to 47.1 in the first three weeks of August, down from 47.8 in July, which was its worst reading since the depths of the previous financial crisis. These figures were released five days after the devaluation of the renminbi. This, coupled with a Chinese stock market in supposed free fall, has led the press and many others to question the health of the Chinese economy and their forecasts for growth.

So is it all doom and gloom or is it just the world markets and the Chinese market correcting itself? The PMI index released by Markit showed the US manufacturing growth has slowed to its weakest pace in 2 years. The traders argued that the falls in US stocks were a direct result of people fearing that China is facing its worst domestic slowdown since the GFC and as we have seen over the past few days this, helped by the press, has spread into other developed and emerging markets.

To put in into perspective, the global market is down 7%. In the crash of ‘87 the market was down 28%. The real issue for China is that the government is caught between its role as cheerleader and regulator and has shown a lack of trust in its own market. The devaluation of the renmibi was explained as an incremental change to China’s financial liberation. The reasons for this were poorly communicated. The real challenge for China is how they manage employment, which is more politically sensitive than GDP. The official unemployment rate is 4%; most believe this is fiction. China has to find work for 7 million graduates a year, which casts doubt on China’s reported statistic of unemployment.

As the press release headlines of doom and gloom, it is worth remembering that the level of sustained growth China has experienced has been the envy of many, even at its so called ‘reduced rate’. China’s economic transition was never going to be easy. The press would have us believe that events this year demonstrate that things are not going to plan; that by pursuing an anti corruption campaign they are preventing initiative and growth. It is true that no economy can be kept on an unrealistic path of expansion by unending stimulus.

It is time to understand and accept that a lower growth rate is ever nearer. This will no doubt stress, test and strain the legitimacy and appetite of China’s leaders for reform in ways that could shape and determine the country’s political and economic path for years to come. China’s economy is okay, in fact it’s better than okay! The Chinese government is not.


Rob Sheffield is NAKAMA’s APAC CEO based in Sydney.

Why Management Doesn’t Get Millennials

millennials

So here we are, Generation Z ‘mobile only enabled’, Millennials, Gen Y, Generation Slashie and the Yuccie all co-existing. In a period where consumers are more confused than ever (see PepsiCo CEO: We’ve never seen consumers so confused) you can’t help but feel sorry for the manager of the truly diverse work force. At a time when the global workforce and economies face two key issues – a labor shortage and an ageing population – the contingent workforce is set to be over 50% contract globally by 2020.

Your average worker in the next decade could have over 7 jobs. It’s an increasingly common view and one held by Anton Andrews, Director of Microsoft’s Envisaging Lab, that the jobs of the future will involve a series of interactions over an increasingly short space of time. To put it more succinctly, it’s not just the workforce and consumers that are struggling, it’s the management teams and leaders of today and tomorrow.

The workforce around the globe has found it increasingly difficult to balance the demands of work and life. Many of us are working longer hours than ever before, delaying starting families or struggling to understand how their children are going to cope financially. Herein lies one of the key issues; the multi generational workforce is now so fragmented and different that management are faced with the task of engaging a workforce with multiple priorities. This raises the question, ‘does a company vision and culture suit all, or does today’s workforce require multiple visions and sub cultures to function?’ …A question for another time.

Back to the initial idea, the millennial workforce has been more affected than perhaps the newer generations entering the labour market specifically by the economy; workers in companies that shed employees are still doing the work of multiple people. Salaries have not increased in line with costs of living. This is certainly a contributing factor, however an important point to make is that most bosses just don’t get Millennials.

Research suggests that over 80% of Millennials are engaged in a dual income situation, with both individuals working full time. With Generation X, this figure drops to 70% and out of the generation of baby boomers born just after WWII, who incidentally occupy over 60% of top management jobs, only 45% have a full time working partner. More typically, this partner will work part time and will be responsible for taking care of home life duties. This leads to what Karyn Twaronite, EY global-diversity and inclusiveness officer, sees as an empathy gap in the workplace. Her view is one that I agree with: “when there’s frustration about work-life balance in the workplace, and you think your boss doesn’t get it, that very likely could be true.’

One of the key shifts in the workplace moving forward will be around real time communication and real time tools; responsive networks creating dynamic participation. In short technology, in the eyes of a modern workforce, frees them up to work from anywhere. The traditional management, who are more accustomed to work cultures with more face time, may start to see only empty cubicles. Crazily enough, at a recent Microsoft talk the audience of leaders were informed that 60% of desks in any organisation are empty at any moment!

The modern workforce are more about social, physical face to face moments, with 96% of people wanting a community and co-working human relationships, as a community increases productivity by 20%. For companies that are desperate to hire workers, specifically Millennials, the group that is apparently the one companies are desperate to attract and retain, is the most dissatisfied.

There have been multiple surveys from the likes of EY and BCG that show what Millennials most want is flexibility in where, when and how they work. Most would take a pay cut, turn down a promotion or be willing to move to manage work-life demands better. Only in Australia does the pay issue buck the trend. As a result, a key reason for moving in Australia is increased pay in line with work life balance.

Old school management styles have led to the millennial workforce feeling that having a flexible schedule leads to negative consequences. A lack of flexibility has been regularly cited as one of the top reasons in this generation for workers to quit their jobs.

Working in recruitment in a variety of different geographical areas, one of the key requirements from the millennial workforce we see focuses around work-life balance. This was increasingly uncommon in Asia until 18 months ago. The mindset of management needs to change from seeing flexibility as making an exception to the norm. The reality is that a large proportion of management are still managing the way they have been for over a decade, and a large proportion of companies and management teams have been slow to realise that the Millenials are feeling burned out; they seek a balance that a large proportion of the newer generational workforces demand.

Today’s management teams need to navigate a tricky environment, however they also need to realise that the workforce of the future and the work of the future will be technology based, require trust, empathy, collaboration and flexibility, and that if they want to hire and retain a millennial workforce the focus is on flexibility, health and relationships in equal measure.


Rob Sheffield is Nakama’s APAC CEO and is based in Sydney.

Meet Shuddha, our new Social Media Consultant in Hong Kong

Shuddha

Name/Title: Shuddha Dutta, Consultant

Sector you recruit for: Social Media and Content

What are you known for professionally?  I’m known to be very organised and I don’t really get stressed easily. I can remain absolutely calm under stressful situations, which I think is a valuable quality!

Where can we find you when you’re not working? I love the outdoors and I also enjoy photography. So when I’m not at work, I’m on a beach or hiking, as long as it looks nice and I can take pictures, that’s where you will find me.

Any secret/special talents? It’s not a secret, but I cook fairly well, especially Indian dishes such as biryani! I also love taking photographs, at the risk of sounding immodest, I take pretty good pictures!

What is your social media channel of choice? Instagram due to my photography hobby! I love taking and also looking at other photos.

What’s been your favourite thing about working at Nakama so far? People are friendly and helpful and I’ve really enjoyed that. They’ve made it really easy to settle in for me.

What’s the coolest thing you’ve done in HK? I just saw the last races of the season, which was a cool experience for me!

What do you love about working in recruitment? The opportunity to meet a lot of people from different backgrounds – culturally and professionally.


Shuddha is based in our NAKAMA Hong Kong office and can be reached on m: +852 94053120 or sdutta@nakamahongkong.com.